FAQs and why you should give a faq – with Adam Smith and Mark Mars

March 16, 2021 00:44:43
FAQs and why you should give a faq – with Adam Smith and Mark Mars
Niche Website Builders Show
FAQs and why you should give a faq – with Adam Smith and Mark Mars
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Show Notes

 

In this episode of the Niche Website Builders Podcast, Mark Mars and Adam Smith talk about their personal investment portfolios. Adam tends to focus on buying and flipping websites, while Mark is more into cash flow and keeping websites.

Also, they discuss FAQs, question-based content, and the testing that shows results. Stay tuned as they introduce and offer a new FAQ service for question-based content. Why should you give a FAQ?

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Episode Transcript

Speaker 0 00:00:09 Are you ready to get serious about building content sites and building a profitable business online. Welcome to the niche website builders podcast. We bring you the latest field, tested tips, tricks and strategies for building a profitable online asset. We interview industry experts, share customer success stories and reveal our own experiences. Working on hundreds of sites to inspire and motivate you to make something happen. Let's do this. This episode is brought to you by niche website builders, an agency dedicated to helping people just like you build profitable content sites, niche website builders are the hands-off content site marketing agency. You always wished existed. It's run by content site marketers for content site marketers, and they help both investors and individuals alike build profitable online properties. They provide a fully outsourced approach to content creation link-building and done for you. Website builds the same approach they use on their own six-figure portfolios. For example, their content packages come with a proprietary keyword research process are written by in-house native English speakers formatted using templates proven to convert and uploaded to WordPress with affiliate links added so that all you need to do is hit the publish button. Check them [email protected] slash show that's niche, website.builders/show, and fill out the form to get coupon codes for 10% more content, or a 10% discount on links with your first order sent right to your inbox. Speaker 1 00:01:46 Hi, and welcome to another episode of the niche website, build a podcast and YouTube channel. Uh, we don't have a guest this week. Uh, it's just me and Mark who are going to interview each other, uh, change it up a little bit, something different for you. Um, so we're going to talk this week a little bit about, um, what we're currently doing, both me and Mark on a personal level. So what we, our approach to website investing is slightly different. I'm more of a buy, improve and flip kind of guy, and Mark's more of a buy and invest for the longterm for the cashflow kind of guy. So we're just going to cover that. Um, we're just gonna talk a lot about, uh FAQ's and question-based content. We've been doing lots of internal testing around that and we see some really good results. So we just want to talk to you about that and then we'll finish up then with some exciting news about a new service that we're gonna offer, which is all about the question based stuff. So, um, lots to cover today. Uh, Mark, how are you? I'm very well, thanks. First question though. What the hell is that t-shirt you're wearing? So Joe exotic, t-shirts my, it's my lucky tiger. T-shirt with Joe. Um, uh, yeah, I'm repping for him to get out of prison. Speaker 1 00:02:56 This is one of many, I have a couple of them, one with, uh, with Louis Theroux on the front, and I've got one with Gail, whether from coronation street on the front as well. Um, me and me and Jess would literally just scrolling through Facebook a couple of weeks back. And, uh, she saw Mr. Blobby t-shirts, which led us down this rabbit hole of looking for all these crazy cool looking t-shirts. And we ended up spending a fortune on some guy's Shopify store. Uh, we just clearly just printed them on plain t-shirts and sending them out. Speaker 2 00:03:27 Yeah. Well, what a treat for future episodes? I think, you know, um, I think our us audience is going to be Googling like Mr. Blobby and, uh, you know, coronation street now because they have no idea what we're talking about. Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Okay. So yeah. Great stuff. So, um, yeah, we're going to, I guess we're going to start off with like, just a, I dunno, just some insight, I guess, into what you and I are kind of doing ourselves for our own portfolios before we start talking more about FAQ. So yeah. W what are you up to at the moment? Speaker 1 00:03:59 Yeah. Um, so I've, I've got like my, my staple Pope part of the portfolio, which is just my cashflow generating section of the portfolio. Um, these are the, the kind of sites that I, I want to keep longterm. Um, I always flitter between, do I want to sell them? And I'm always, literally every month I add up the revenue and I've got a revenue tracker, and I'm always looking at what the last six and three and nine months average were. And, uh, then I, I look up how much they're worth and I'm always like, I'm going to sell this nice cash there. And, but I typically don't, I keep those sites, but what I've been doing more and more of recently, um, as, as time allows, because obviously quite we're quite busy with the agency staff, but is, is by insights that are under monetized, um, either under monetized or undervalued or both, if I can. Speaker 1 00:04:51 Um, there's a lot of, a lot of manual outreach, literally trolling through, you know, a dress top 1 million or majestic stop a million sites. And look in specifically for sites that are all old, outdated, haven't been touched in a long time, you know, maybe just monetize without sands, but they're getting hundreds of thousands of visitors per month. Um, and I'm outreaching to those guys. I'm trying to see if I can buy. So I managed to secure one recently, um, which has been great. I literally bought it in January and I'm just about to close on the sale now. So that was a very nice pick it up, improve the revenue, um, by doing quick wins, very quick wins. Um, and then trying to find buyers then who willing to buy on a, on a forward-looking multiple based on, you know, they can see the potential, there's still lots of stuff that can be fixed on the site and change on the site, but they can also see that I've made these quick wins and revenues increased 20, 30, 40%, um, and are willing to buy on those kinds of multiples. So, uh, that's what I've been doing more and more of. Um, and yeah, I love, I love that space. It's quick, it's in and out. I feel like I'm tuning over my cash often, which suits my personality. I hate just having money sitting there and kind of not doing anything with, so yeah, that's what I've been doing. What are you, what are you you're, you're totally different. Speaker 2 00:06:15 Yeah. So you're going to tend to get higher multiples, um, you know, based on just like one or two months revenue at the moment. Speaker 1 00:06:22 Yeah. Yeah. So, um, um, there's obviously trying to buy, right. Uh, and one, one issue that I'm coming up against when I'm reaching out to these site owners, because they're not in selling modes, you know, they, they're not considering selling and they get an email out of the blue asking if they want to sell. Um, the valuation that they put on the site typically is a lot higher than what it's actually worth. You know, these people are trying to sell sites. One guy was trying to sell site at all over a hundred X, multiple, which, you know, it's just, it's just not doable for an investor. Um, but, but you can't find them. So, um, I bought the site, the site that we were talking about now, um, was bought at a 37 X multiple. Um, and I've just sold it at a, at a 50 X, multiple. Speaker 2 00:07:07 Yeah. So I guess I was more meaning, Oh, you finished at 50. That's good. I mean, I guess I was more meaning that you're growing revenue in a short period of time. So you're growing revenue in like, uh, you know, just over a two month period, but then people are finding people that are willing to buy it at that higher rate, even though there's not the history. Speaker 1 00:07:24 Yeah. Well, I think it's, you've got to take a look at the site as a whole, right? So these, these types of sites that I'm talking about, they've been around for 10 years. Uh, you know, they've been around for a long time. They've weathered many Google updates. There's been very little fluctuation in the traffic. They haven't had big spikes up and down. So I think I'm trying to find people who appreciate that, who appreciate that the sites have been around for a long time. They've been stable for a long time. The content typically is very good. So it's usually written by someone who's passionate about the nation. That's probably one of the reasons why it's under monetized or hasn't been updated in a while. You know, they, they did all this work five, six years ago, and then they just kind of stopped looking at it, uh, stopped updating it. Speaker 1 00:08:08 Um, didn't monetize it and they don't really realize what kind of asset they have on their hands essentially. Um, so the buyers that w when I, when I try and put this together for a potential buyer, I'm trying to bake all of that in, um, I'm trying to get them to understand that they're not, I know we, we don't sell sites on potential, but they are essentially buying on that future potential one that it's going to be, it's going to continue to stay steady. And two that they stay, they see the rest of the quick wins that I've seen, but haven't yet implemented. So when I pulled together a, a document, like when I was selling on this site, the document actually included what the quick wins were. So for example, 10% of the traffic comes from the U S but there's no us monetization there. Speaker 1 00:08:56 Um, there's no display ads on there. And I pulled together a, um, a sheet of a spreadsheet of what I think the revenue could be based on a $10 CPM or RPM, which is quite low, so they can instantly see, you know, if they, if they add us monetization, they're going to add a 10% increase in revenue. If they turn on display ads, they can add another couple of hundred dollars a month in revenue. And I almost make it too easy for them to see that if they do all this, then it justifies the valuation. I just don't have time to do it myself. Speaker 2 00:09:28 Yeah. Cool. Excellent. So, yeah, in terms of, um, different, um, different yeah, just, yeah. Like, so I'm different in, uh, I guess so, yeah. I mean, I've always been, I'm not like, Oh, I dunno. I think over again, like the thought of like selling and like the handling of the buyer and like transferring of OSI and kind of doing all that. I just, like, it gives me a headache thinking about it. Like, I'd rather, I feel like I just, that prevents me from selling sometimes. And, um, it's not actually that bad. It's never that bad, but it's just, I think it's the thought of it. I think I'd probably say I've done enough of them to like, for it to become like a second nature, but like, um, th the, the, the main thing that I'm doing, look, I've got slightly different mindset now to what I was doing before. Speaker 2 00:10:17 So I've always looked to hold longer, especially longer than you. And that's just like the couple of months kind of flipped. So I'm looking for it. I'm looking for the right time to sell, but I'm like, I'm trying to, I'm trying to grow a site, you know, over a longer, longer period of time, but I'm just finding the right time. So I've still got that flip kind of mentality. I want to find the right choose the right time to sell. But I guess what I'm trying to do now right now is I'm working on some sites where I just want to maintain like a foundation of like cashflow. So it's one sites that I plan to hold for a very long time, um, which are just constantly money that's coming in the cashflow wise, not even thinking about setting them at any point in the future at the same time as continuing the flipping model. So, you know, I've always got this money coming in. Like that's just long-term as a baseline. And then I'm still doing all the flips on top of which, you know, obviously it's gonna be better overall in terms of just the money that's coming in. So Speaker 1 00:11:10 Quick question, you mentioned there, you're waiting for the right time to sell. How do you know when that is? Because I mean, it's easy to think, or, you know, I'm waiting for the right time revenues going up and up and, you know, when revenue starts going down and then you're trying to sell a site, that's on a downward trend, it's a lot harder to sell a site on downward trend than it is on an upward trend. How are you, how are you thinking about when is that right time? Speaker 2 00:11:35 It's, it's kind of, it's not, it's a bit of finger in the air and obviously, like you say, you want to be sending on an upward trend, so I've never not working on a site. I don't ever all of my sites. I don't really let sit and just sit for a long period of time. So I'm always working on them. They're always getting new content. They're always getting back links. So yeah, sometimes they do seem to plateau for a period of time. And sometimes, you know, they, they even seem, seem to be trending down a bit, but over time, it, you know, you'll get a, a, an update, uh, which means then you kind of, you get a kind of a quick jump or it'll just start trending back upwards, like, because you've got more content and warnings coming in. So like, uh, yeah, like I would definitely probably look for when it's just time to take one of those turns. Speaker 2 00:12:18 But, um, again, I'm, I'm kind of holding for a long time, all the sites I do have, they just they're there because I don't have this baseline of sites where I've got this baseline income, they all pay the money that's coming in from those are paying, you know, I don't put any new money in. They just, they, they reinvest the money that I earn from those sites into, into new stuff. So, um, they're kind of all my cash flow, but that's not the, what I've got in my head. Like th th there are no I'm looking to sell them in the next year or two, you know, but, um, um, so yeah, so I think that's the, that's, that's, that's the change. Well, I have to like this, this, this race of sites that, which will become the cashflow should become maybe the investment mechanism for the sites and for new sites and things like that. Speaker 2 00:13:01 But, uh, but you know, I'll still be doing the same as what I'm doing now, but I'll just have these other sites that are just constant revenue stream. So I've got like three sites I've started at the moment. I don't know if it will be more than that. Maybe if the right opportunity comes along, but there's a couple of books on expired, the main, so one, I bought an expired domain. It was, it was actually a failed, um, Kickstarter project in the niche that I'm working in. So it's kind of had some good kind of news type sites that kind of high authority kind of news sites, but, but I'll see the, the, the articles that they're writing on those new sites are very topical in terms of the, what the Kickstarter project was. And then now what the niches and on all of these sites are kind of informational sites. Speaker 2 00:13:44 I'm building, none of them are affiliates. So I feel like that's kind of less risky. Um, just like, um, you know, we saw that even a pandemic, you couldn't really do much to damage, uh, ad revenue, um, over time. So I'm figuring I'm just going to try and build a bunch of, so all these sites are gonna just be mostly ad revenue, uh, kind of sites. So, uh, just by, by luck as well, um, a site came upon niche website flippers, which is, um, a site, which was in the niche, the same niche. So I've put in a very short period of time of around, uh, six to eight weeks. I put on about 175 posts. They're quite short posts are in about a thousand words each, because that's all they needed to be. That's what the competition were doing for ranking that it's not, it's not particularly competitive. Speaker 2 00:14:30 Um, but I put 175 posts in the traffic was trending up nicely, and it got to about a thousand, uh, sessions. Then the site came along that had, um, 28, I think it was 28 posts and was getting about four and a half thousand sessions. It was about two years old, uh, have basically no back links, which kind of, um, you know, gave me more confidence in the niche that actually, you know, you can prove you can rank pretty well with the minimal number of posts. Um, and so I bought that site. Um, it didn't cost very much because it, you know, it was wasn't really, there was no monetization monetization really. Um, and you read up three Oh one, all the posts from that site into the new one, which now, so now I've got a combined traffic of around 7,000 sessions a month between the two, uh, Mount certainly site, but it's just continually trending upwards because all of those, 175 posts that I've got around aging. Speaker 2 00:15:25 And I mean, I'm ex I'm going to continue to build on that, but I expect if I was to leave it right, it was hoping that I'd quite comfortably get up to 40, 50,000 sessions a month just with what I got from what I've seen from the competitors. Maybe even more, maybe even after a hundred thousand, he just, he just had to see our guys, but I'm going to continue. I feel really good about that one. I've got to continue to add more and more pieces. There's like almost an unlimited scope, but a lot of scope for more posts on that site. Um, I also bought a second, Speaker 1 00:15:51 A good question there, Mark. How did you, um, how did you handle the redirects? Did you, did you just use a plugin and redirect each page and did you move all of the pages over, um, or just move some of them over? Speaker 2 00:16:04 So I used a, I just edited the HT access file, uh, just because it's quicker, um, than, than, uh, using a plugin. Um, so, you know, not quicker in terms of implementation, but quicker in terms of the redirect speed. Um, but, um, um, yeah, so that, that's, that's generally the way I do it. I redirected all of the pages, but not the homepage. Um, so all of the blog posts are the 28 blog posts, but not the home page, the home page. You've got to be a little bit wary anyway, when redirecting home pages in general. I mean, this one, wasn't so much of a problem because it had like next to no back links, the backlinks, it did have were just a few spammy organic ones, I mean, picked over time, which I'm sure Google they're blatantly ones that Google would probably recognizes as spam. So I didn't haven't bothered, disavowing anything yet I could do, but I didn't, I didn't redirect the homepage, um, uh, because it was getting no traffic as well. So I figured there's no point. Speaker 1 00:17:03 What about category pages and things like that? Did you redirect those or did you just leave them as they were? Speaker 2 00:17:09 I haven't redirected them. No. Um, yeah, I should probably look at that. I haven't looked at what the kind of traffic they were getting by now. I haven't, I hadn't redirected them. I just put them into the categories that I've got on the new site. Yeah. Obviously the other reason that you got to be wary when redirecting a homepage potentially is the, uh, the anchor text, uh, ratio. So if you've got, uh, a site with a lot of branded anchor, um, or to the homepage and it's G and you've got, you know, you're redirecting it into a site that hasn't got a lot of branded anchor or has got less branded anchor, you could throw like all of that out. And, you know, we've seen, we've seen issues with that before. So there are reasons for, I mean, it wasn't the case in this case, like I had plenty of branded anchor on the, on the expired domain that I've got, um, which could have taken the hit, but again, it was getting no traffic. Speaker 2 00:17:56 It was almost like, it was just, didn't seem much value in doing it. No links, no traffic. Uh, but what I did do is I left the existing site in place, um, as well. So it just kind of sitting there as a, as a shell at the moment. Um, yeah. So, yeah, and then I've got a boy, another expired domain, which I'm just built a building out the site for at the moment, which is just another, uh, which is more in, was in like a beverages kind of niche. And so that, that, I'll just see how that goes. The other ones I'm working on at the moment quite interesting is that I started it October, 2018. So what was it two and a half years ago nearly, and I hadn't looked, hadn't touched it for ages. So I had put around twenty-five posts on it and just left it and then looked at the analytics. Speaker 2 00:18:41 And just over time, it's just trended continually trended upwards. So it's not like it just is a brand new domain. It's not like we just went straight up and then was then was flat-lining for two years. It's literally been on an upward trend very slowly for two years to look a thousand sessions. Um, and so I figured, you know, actually it's looking quite healthy now starting to get a few sales through from it, um, that the, the products are quite, uh, it's pretty much, it's 50, 50 affiliate and info content at the moment, but the products are quite high value. So it's quite a good commission when they do come through. Um, but, um, yeah, I'm going to, again, just utilize that now it's aged, it's two years old. I'm going to go to the info content route with that, and just start building more content on that site. That's in the home, one of the home niches and just keep, um, yeah, just, yeah, the plan is to add like a couple of hundred info posts and see how they go as well. Speaker 1 00:19:40 Yeah. I love that side because, uh, you just messaged me one light. I was like, look at this, I forgot about this site. I'd done this two years ago. Speaker 2 00:19:48 I look at this graph. Yeah, I know it was weird. It was just trending you continually to move. Yeah. I thought I'd be interesting to see how often that happens. You know, if you just put, put some posts on the side is, was weird. I found it weird that it just was still trending up even today two and a half years later when no, I hadn't updated any posts. I hadn't even, um, updated plugins or anything, you know, it's just, it was just sitting there. So, um, yeah, very strange. But, but yeah, he seemed got the website basically. Yeah. Maybe that's the way to do it. Just to set up a light and, uh, two years later you Speaker 1 00:20:25 Can come and meet me in two years time and see what's happening. Speaker 2 00:20:28 Yeah. Awesome. Um, so I think it's enough. None of us. Um, but like, yeah. So today I guess, um, we're going to talk a little bit about, um, FAQ's and why we should give a fuck about FAQ's. So yeah. I like the worst joke ever. I'm a dad of three, but, uh, yeah. Yeah. So yeah. Why should we give a FAC Adam? Speaker 1 00:20:56 Yeah, I mean, yeah, this is something which I've been, I've been looking into over the last couple of minutes and testing quite a bit, um, on our own site and we've started beat the test and with some, some clients' stuff now. So we basically come up with, we stumbled upon this idea by, by looking at something else. So we can test in this a couple of different tools. And one of the tools we tested allows you to run your content through Google's NLP algorithm. So it's the natural process in language algorithm. Um, and they'd also built their own NLP algorithm, which is more aggressive. So Google only spits out the entities. They think your content is about if they're shoer it's about that. But, um, these guys had also built their own version, which is, which is you, would you use Wikipedia? So all of the entities are Wikipedia pages. Speaker 1 00:21:48 Um, and, and there, there were a lot less aggressive. So they spit out the entities, even if they think it's closely matched, not a hundred percent. So when we were doing this, um, what we noticed was this is great for, for basically understanding what Google thinks a piece of content is about, uh, because you can run your piece of content through there, spits out the entities and the entities are literally just, you know, one single word or two words, um, topics, uh, on what they think that page is about. And that's great because you can, you can kind of see if you're hitting the Mark, are you covering anything? You can, you can compare that to your competitors entities and see, you know, are the glaring gaps that you need to cover. Um, but obviously because we're a content company that's, that's not really actionable. Speaker 1 00:22:36 You can't just give a list of single words, topics to your team and say, go and create content. Um, cause it just doesn't work like that. Um, so we tried to figure out how do we turn those entities into something useful and what we came up with having haven't done some research is, um, is questions. Can we turn those entities into questions? Uh, and how do we find kind of seed questions, key questions, and also the sub questions that Google is expecting. So we did all this research and we basically come up with a method for using these entities to mind the people also ask box on Google. And what that does is gives you a, a list of, of primary questions and then you can go a level deeper. So you've got your list of primary questions. You can then go and mine, the sub questions for each, uh, each primary question. And in doing so you, you answer, you basically cover the entity, the Google's expecting, but in a, in a friendly question-based format. So that's kind of like the, the premises of what we've been doing. And I don't know if that answers why you give a FAC, but that kind of is like an introductional on how we got to this point and like where this whole journey started for us. Speaker 2 00:23:54 Yeah. So, I mean, um, so yeah, you know, I guess we could start talking about why we should give a, give a fuck. How many times can we get that joke into this episode, I think is, is the point, but, um, what w what does it mean for the featured snippet then that's one reason to give a fuck, correct. Speaker 1 00:24:14 Yeah. So, so what does this mean when you, when you're making content? So there are, there are three main benefits of creating content this way that we find, um, one is because we're taking the questions from the people also ask box. Um, we know that if you, if you Google those questions individually, uh, at least 80% of the time, there's a featured snippet at the top. So if we write a concise answer and answer those questions in a good way that Google is, is expecting, and we can kind of brief the team on that, because we can see what the featured the little snippet is, and the people also ask box and what words are bolded and what we need to include. So if we answer the question correctly in the format that Google wants, 80% of these questions, there's a very good chance of us winning, featured snippets for, and we all know that featured snippets are a, you know, a coveted position on, on the search, on the SERPs. Speaker 1 00:25:06 They're, they're a good thing to have. Um, you can get, uh, you can get your pay your, your piece of content at position nine. And as long as you're on page one, there's a good chance you can win a featured snippet. So, you know, you can jump, you can leapfrog from position nine straight to, uh, to number zero, if you're able to, to answer these featured snippets. Um, the second, the second benefit is when we cover all of these topics, we know that these are topics that Google are expecting you to cover in order to show you an authority, um, because the, you know, if you put your seed keyword into, into the tool and it spits out all of these questions, these questions are what Google thinks are either hyper related or people then go on to search for next. So it's almost like, okay, well, I'm going to look at, um, I'm going to look at chairs. Speaker 1 00:25:56 Uh, and then Google says, well, people who look at chairs also want to know, um, how to, how to sit correctly with your posture. And does it matter if you have a short chair and a high desk and all these other, you know, they're, they're probably really bad examples, but, um, you know, that these are questions that Google wants you to answer to show that you are an authority on the subject and that you cover the topic in full. And it's, it's really difficult to do that from a standing start. So it's really difficult to think of, you know, chairs, for example, and uncover what all those questions are or could be, or even if you could, how do you know that they are, what Google wants you to cover? So by doing this, we're, we kind of reverse engineer in Google's own system and looking at what they want you to cover, um, which kind of leads me onto my next part, which, which is the third reason why this is good. Speaker 1 00:26:45 And that's these questions typically aren't in the traditional keyword research tools, databases. So for example, we recently found, um, 650 questions all about, um, cleaning, like cleaning a specific product, which kind of blows my mind because I didn't realize there were 650 questions that you could answer around how you clean this specific thing. Um, and I thought, well, all right, well, what if I put this into H refs, what will this show? And I put it in, and AHS only had 60 of those questions in the database. So, you know, over 500 of those questions, they didn't even have, they didn't even have any database. They couldn't display it in their, in their results, which, which is a massive benefit for us because, um, most traditional SEO's or most traditional affiliate owners, um, they use these tools for keyword research. So if you are able to uncover these questions that aren't available to people who do the research in these tools, and you're able to answer them in a concise way that, you know, Google won't want you to answer them, you've got a massive advantage over. It's just the massive advantage advantage. Speaker 2 00:27:51 Yeah. And, and yeah, I guess one, just one point to clarify, I guess at one point another question for you. So the, I guess the point to clarify, when we say about 80% chance of getting the featured snippet is that, you know, if we were to Google all of those questions, then we would find that 80% of the time that, that question. Yeah. The question is the featured, the answer to the question is the featured snippet. Um, so yes. Speaker 1 00:28:16 Yeah. And by D I added always by adding all these questions to either to existing pages or create a new pages with multiple questions, um, you're actually making that page eligible for multiple featured snippets. Speaker 2 00:28:29 Okay. And do we care if these, these questions that we are putting into our content in a zero, according to age reps? Zero volume. Okay. Speaker 1 00:28:38 Yeah. Well, we don't actually know if there's zero volume or not, because it hairdress, or SEMrush is actually don't have them in the database. Um, but in all honesty, no, we, we, that's not really a factor for this, this isn't a, I'm looking for a really high search volume tomb with low, low difficulty. What we're trying to demonstrate to Google here is that we are answering all of the questions that they feel as relevant or hyper relevant to this specific topic. Um, and anybody who's searching for them, you know, we have a direct answer for it. Plus, you know, each answer isn't literally just a 50 word reply or a 50 50 would answer. We'd go into a little bit more depth each one's like when we, when we've been testing this as 150 to 200 words in terms of answering each question. So we also add in lots of content around long tail keywords about the topic too. So even though the main, the main question may not have search volume, answering questions, answering the question, or the long tail associated keywords probably do. Speaker 2 00:29:39 Yeah, yeah. For, yeah. It's just, yeah, just making it clear that, you know, with absolutely topically relevant, you know, we were basically reverse engineering. Google's own technology to, to tell, tell us what they, what they want and what they expect in terms of the, the topical relevance. So if we include that, the idea is that, um, they're gonna rank us for all sorts of stuff on that, on that page. So, I mean, you know, what results, Speaker 1 00:30:07 Well, before we go, I was just gonna say, think about it like this way. It's great. It's great for creating, um, almost like mini silos. So for example, you've got a best of article on a specific topic and you don't have much support in content around that. How's Google going to how's Google going to look at that site versus a site that has a best all on the same topic, but then also has, you know, five supporting pieces of content that each answer five questions that Google thinks are hyper-relevant like, they're just going to think, well, this site is much more of an authority because they cover all these, these fringe topics as well. So, um, it's, it's really good for that. It's good for pulling out what content do you already have? Can we create some additional content for that page? Or can we also go up or go away and create this, um, this brand new standalone content that just shows to Google and, and displays to Google that you are, you know, you kind of know what you're talking about in this field. You cover in these questions and you've got some, you've got topical relevance there. Speaker 2 00:31:08 So when you're building out this cluster of as, uh, uh, associated questions and content, you know, how, how are you structuring those questions? Are we just doing one question that answers what, you know, one, one question, one article that answers one question, or are we answering multiple questions in there? Like, how should we look to structure this kind of cluster then the content within that? Speaker 1 00:31:31 Yeah. So it's a really good question. So for existing content, we'll literally just add, add in question and answers. Um, and then for standalone content, there's a, there's typically a main question, which is the, usually the title of the article. So for example, it could be, um, what could, what food can vegans eat, and then within that piece of content, there'll be sub-questions then. So can vegans eat cheese, can vegans eat, um, meat, that kind of thing. So it's structured that way, where you have a seed keyword or a main keyword or a main question. And then it's, it's filled out below with all of the supporting questions. And again, we run the same process because we run that main question through the same method to uncover what the questions are. Google thinks you need to be covering to answer that question in full. Speaker 2 00:32:21 Yeah. Makes sense. Makes sense. Okay. So, um, we've done some testing on your own sites and, um, you know, we started to work with some customers on it. So what, what kind of, what have you seen from kind of trying to implement some of this? Speaker 1 00:32:38 Yeah. So there's two things to talk about here, which I think are important. Um, the first one is just to mention that, um, when we do this, we add FAQ schema markup. So, um, that's done on the backend and, and that's, that's important for two reasons. Um, um, I've talked about this in the last couple of podcasts in that I'm super bullish on schema, just schema in general, because I think the easier you can make it to, to present Google with this is what the data on my webpage is about in a format that the, that the machine can understand and the better. Um, so it's important to think that we do that. Uh, and in doing that, we, any pages that are already on page one, usually you have to be on page one to activate this, but by adding schema markup, you also enable the little FAQ box to appear below your, your result in SERP. Speaker 1 00:33:31 Um, and it just gives you more real estate space. It makes you more prominent, um, and actually seen some of this in the results, which, uh, which are we'll come on to next. So what I've done, uh, on my own site is, um, I took, uh, the top 20 pages. So I went through analytics, looked at what my top 20 pages were by organic traffic. And I added 60 questions, or just over 63 questions to those pages. I added the FAQ schema markup, um, which is obviously done on the backend. Uh, this was added, uh, just over two weeks ago. So the test is still quite new in terms of adding stuff to new sites. You, um, but it's really cool because in search console, we can actually track what impact this is having, especially on FAQ schema, um, on the, on the FAQ scheme of stuff. Speaker 1 00:34:21 So in there in search console, you can go in and you can, you can click on search appearance and you can click on FAQ, rich data or rich markup. I can't remember if it's called in there, but you can actually see what clicks, impressions, average position click-through rate, that's driving for you on, on what pages and queries. So as soon as we did this, and as soon as I added the FAQ, uh, schema went into search console after a couple of days, and I could see it in there. I could see the graph trending up in terms of impressions clicks. Now that in itself, didn't add a whole lot of traffic because when you think about it, the site's already ranking typically for lots of these queries anyway, but what's interesting to point out is the click through rate. And so when you check the, those pages and search console, uh, without debt, without the FAQ schema. Speaker 1 00:35:07 So just from web click through rate, I was getting was around 2.3%. But when I look at the same page as just from the FAQ schema, it's 4%. So it's almost twice. People are almost twice as likely to click on those FAQ snippets in the search results, rather than just, um, just click on your result. And that kind of makes sense, because if they've typed in a specific question and you don't have the schemer on there, and they just see, you know, if they're searching for can vegans eat milk, can vegans eat dairy products, and you have that question added to a page all about what can vegans eat. There's a higher chance they'll click on your result if they can see in the shirt, the FAQ, when you've actually got that question answered on the page. So it makes sense that the, that that's there. Speaker 1 00:35:50 Um, traffic is starting to trend it up slightly on the site as a, as a whole in terms of pages. Um, I it's too early. I mean, it's only been a couple of weeks to tell if it's just from the FAQ, but I haven't really done anything else to the site apart from that. So, you know, it's, it's a good sign. The other thing that this has done, which has almost been a by-product, um, is increase my, uh, RPM across the sites. So the sites with media vine, um, and by adding this additional content just as a, as a, uh, didn't even mean for this to happen, but, uh, the contents no longer, which means there's more ad spots in there and my RPM has gone up. So my RPM has increased, um, sharing some data with you marks going up almost $10 since I've done this experiment, which, which is crazy. Speaker 1 00:36:36 So that's, that's some of the early tests that we've, we've seen of adding it to, to exist sites. Um, but we've also now been doing the same methodology and add in standalone content. So I built a brand new website it's on unexpired domain, and all I'm doing is adding this type of content to it. Doesn't have any type of there's an any other type of contents or question-based content. And that's taken off really quick, um, like extremely quick. And I know there are loads of other factors in terms of, you know, working with expired domains and some take off quicker than others, but because this is all long tail question-based keywords, it just seems that the Google likes it quicker. Um, and, uh, it's a good basis, I think for building the good foundation for building relevance around the topic. Like, I'll go back afterwards and add the, the, the main articles that I would normally add to the side. But this is a great way of saying to Google, Hey, look, I'm starting to become an expert on this topic because I've now answered 300 questions that I know you are expecting people to ask when they search for this topic. Speaker 2 00:37:43 Yeah. Yeah. Cool. All makes sense. So we're we're um, yeah, well, we just launched a service, right. Offering a niche website builders, offering, offering to do this kind of thing for existing sites, existing posts, as well as kind of a new posts, new sites, and creating up creating new clusters and silos and things like that. So how does that work as a service? What, what can people expect if they come to us and, Speaker 1 00:38:11 Yeah. Yeah. So, um, there, there are two aspects of the service, um, or two ways that it works, like you mentioned, one is updating existing content, and one is adding new content. Now we don't expect you to know which one you want or need before you order. So when you order, we'll have an onboarding call, you would have set already sent over your, your site, your URL, and we would have done some, some research around what we think would be best for your site, whether that would be to, to update your existing content or to look at in, um, new standalone supporting content. So it's on a case by case basis, but essentially we will help you understand what we think your site needs. Um, and then we'll go away and we will plan that out for you. So if it's updating your existing content, we will go away and we'll have a look at what subtopics or sub-questions we think we need to add to these pages. Speaker 1 00:39:02 If it's for supporting content, we'll plan out all of the questions that we can find. Um, tell you, you know, this is, uh, to cover these questions in, uh, in the manner that we think need to be covered, then it's X amount of words of content. Um, and then you basically tell us, okay, I want to do I want to do this? I don't want to do that. Um, you know, however, however you want to play with your own site then, but essentially you don't have to do any of the thinking. We will do all of the analysis for you. We'll do all of the research for you. And then we'll just present back to you a, an FAQ plan on, on what we think would, would work best for you. Speaker 2 00:39:38 Awesome. Um, that sounds good. I think I have any more questions on that. How about, is there anything we've missed? Speaker 1 00:39:48 Well, the other thing I think is just a, we forgot to mention that is that we also add in the FAQ schema markup for you as well. So you don't have to worry about, um, you don't have to worry about that. Um, we don't use any Jenn plugins to generate the schema to actually regenerate ourselves. And then we use, we do use a plugin to insert it, but when it's a script plugin to allow us to insert the schema directly onto the, into the head of each page. Um, so there's no additional bloat in terms of like, you know, you need to have a rank math, premium plugin to activate their FAQ box or anything like that. It's we handle all of that stuff for you. Essentially. We just take away the headache for you, you know, it's a good service and, you know, it's something that you want to do, uh, but you don't know how to do it yourself. And we will just take away all the headaches. Speaker 2 00:40:32 Yeah. I mean, for me with my stuff, it's like the stuff I know that I should do all the time. I know I should have more questions here and I should just adding, I should, I should have more schema in general when you just kind of net it kind of, those things are always, let's just not very glamorous. You split further down the list, but you know, you should be doing it, you know, you'll benefit from that. So, um, yeah, I'm really excited about offering this out and seeing kind of our clients getting some results from it, you know? Speaker 1 00:40:59 Yeah, yeah. The, the feedback we've got from, from clients we've tested this with so far has been great. So I'm really excited to launch it as a, as an actual service and take it out of beta mode and unleash it onto, uh, onto the world. I've not, I've not seen anything like this. I've not seen a lot seen a service like this, and I've not seen a research approached in this way. Um, I mean, when we first stumbled upon this, we, I searched for days looking for tools to help us do this at the moment. It's, it's, it's a super manual process. Um, you know, doing all this research and covering all these questions in the contemporary is really manual. Um, and there's no tool out there which leads me to believe that there's, nobody's really approaching their, their question-based content from this angle. So, you know, I don't want to say we're the first to do this, but I don't, I can't find any examples of other people doing it. Speaker 2 00:41:51 Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think it's not, it's not kind of new that people are using the, the people also ask box to kind of, to, to, to find opportunities and to find questions. I guess that's not, it, that's definitely something it's been around, but, um, as a service and I'm in the way that we're talking about is probably different, but I mean, that's, you know, that's what we do. That's what we do at each website builders, right? I mean, the way that we research keywords for content clients like is, is just different. You don't, you don't really see it the way that we do it. We don't really reveal what we do for an assure a client. Um, but we, um, you know, we do it in a different way to what you would traditionally see. We just kind of own this stuff that we've tested, we know works. Speaker 2 00:42:32 Um, so yeah, we, we got more, more stuff planned down the road in terms of like bolt ons to our existing services, but, you know, we're running, we're testing them all ourselves at the moment. It's really exciting to actually just be quite experimental and try and have some of these, some of these, these, these things. So you definitely expect more down the road once we've kind of tested them, proven them. And, um, yeah, we know, we know they work and looking forward to like, yeah, being a bit different, I guess, to other services in that, you know, we were trying this stuff out, we know it works. Um, and now, um, yeah, you know, pretty much our clients will be some of the only people doing that kind of stuff out there. Speaker 1 00:43:11 Yeah, definitely. I think that's the difference is, is just making ourselves different, right? Like we, at the heart of it, we are a content and link building agency, but we're so much more than that. I mean, it's the strategy, it's the format and the uploading, like it's, it's the whole package that comes with it. And it's the continual testing of different ideas and methodologies that we, we test ourselves before we, you know, before we take it live out elsewhere. Yeah. Speaker 2 00:43:38 Awesome. Well, thanks. Thanks for having the chat today. Has it been good? Um, and uh, yeah, looking forward to the laundry, but it's like, it's where it's live now. Right. So we can, um, get, if you go to this website, this website and you'll be able to pick up the service there. And, um, if you got any questions, just hit us up in the chat box on the site, or drop us an [email protected] and Adam. And I'll pick that up and I'm happy to jump on a call if you, if you need to. Awesome. Thanks, Mark. All right. Speak soon. Thanks. Thanks again for tuning in, and I hope you enjoyed the show. If you're listening to the podcast version of this episode, please subscribe on iTunes or wherever you listen to your podcasts, please rate and review. As this will allow us to grow our audience and create more shows like this one. If you're watching on YouTube, please subscribe to the channel and click on the bell to be the first to know about any new episodes that we released until the next episode. Goodbye. Speaker 3 00:44:33 <inaudible>.

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